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How does heat affect the life and output of LED? How can one manufacturer's management of heat differ from others?
A: Heat lowers the light intensity of an LED and shortens its useful life. Conventional high output LED arrays are particularly vulnerable to degradation, as it becomes increasingly difficult to shed heat from such arrays. Without aggressive cooling means, high output LED arrays will degrade rapidly because of the significant amount of heat that these LED arrays produce. LED dies are designed to perform optimally at 77˚F (25˚ Celsius) or lower, and by most measures, each 1.8˚F (1˚ C) rise above the level reduces the lumen output of a white LED by .5%. Over time, high heat levels also dramatically shorten an LED’s useful life. Each 30˚F (17˚C) rise in temperature halves the useful service life of most LEDs. Unlike traditional bulbs, LEDs generally do not fail catastrophically, but diminish in intensity over time. Hi-semicon Technology addresses this issue with every step of its luminaire fixture design process. We have generated the following chart to show how many hours of useful life will be achieved at different Junction Temperatures: Judging by the above, it would make sense that practical heat management would be a must when designing a light fixture we have to keep LED junction temperatures [Tj]  below ~ 60 C [140 F] for 70,000 hours of usable life [L70]. Adequate heat rejection [heat dissipation] from the lamp is essential. Passive heat sinks that reject heat to ambient air by convective cooling are the only real, acceptable solution [no fans].

We have generated the following chart to show how many hours of useful life will be achieved at different Junction Temperatures: Judging by the above, it would make sense that practical heat management would be a must when designing a light fixture we have to keep LED junction temperatures [Tj]  below ~ 60 C [140 F] for 70,000 hours of usable life [L70]. Adequate heat rejection [heat dissipation] from the lamp is essential. Passive heat sinks that reject heat to ambient air by convective cooling are the only real, acceptable solution [no fans].
Where is the product manufactured?
A: Even Brand is manufactured in different part of the World. Please see below details for the following brands:
Hi-Semicon (Manufactured in China)
Pelsan Lighting (Manufactured in Turkey)
AFC Lighting ( Manufactured in Turkey)
Spa Electrics (Manufactured in Australia)
Zeta ( Manufactured in UK)
Biggames ( Manufactured in Turkey)
What is your recommendation for current technology replacement with LEDs?
A: Each situation is completely different, we suggest contacting us or one of our representatives for a recommendation on a given project. Remember that all the LEDs are directional lumens pointing exactly where they need to be with no reflective loss. Standard HPS or MH are spherical balls that can lose up to 50% of their initial lumens through reflective material redirecting the light typically straight down into a hot spot. The object of LEDs is to eliminate all wasted lumens and maximize efficiency. Contact us today for our recommendations.
Questions about fluorescent lamps ?
LED tube light replaces to fluorescent lamp:
NO toxic lead/mercury(Ng)/phosphor powders
No fragile glass
NO burn out failure
Cold temperature compatible
Flicker free/no buzzing
Long lifetime
Ballasts must be passed by.
Ballasts and fluorescent lamps
Fluorescent lamps require a ballast to stabilize the lamp and to provide the initial striking voltage required to start the arc discharge. This increases the cost of fluorescent luminaires, though often one ballast is shared between two or more lamps. Electromagnetic ballasts with a minor fault can produce an audible humming or buzzing noise. Conventional lamp ballasts do not operate on direct current. If a direct current supply with a high enough voltage to strike the arc is available, a resistor can be used to ballast the lamp but this leads to low efficiency because of the power lost in the resistor. Also, the mercury tends to migrate to one end of the tube leading to only one end of the lamp producing most of the light. Because of this effect, the lamps (or the polarity of the current) must be reversed at regular intervals.
Flicker problems of fluorescent lamps
Fluorescent fittings using a magnetic mains frequency ballast do not give out a steady light; instead, they flicker (fluctuate in intensity) at twice the supply frequency. While this is not easily discernible by the human eye, it can cause a strobe effect posing a safety hazard in a workshop for example, where something spinning at just the right speed may appear stationary if illuminated solely by a fluorescent lamp. It also causes problems for video recording as there can be a 'beat effect' between the periodic readings of a camera's sensor and the fluctuations in intensity of the fluorescent lamp.Incandescent lamps, due to the thermal inertia of their element, fluctuate to a lesser extent. This is also less of a problem with compact fluorescents, since they multiply the line frequency to levels that are not visible. Installations can reduce the stroboscope effect by using lead-lag ballasts, by operating the lamps on different phases of a polyphase power supply, or by use of electronic ballasts. Electronic ballasts do not produce light flicker, since the phosphor persistence is longer than a half cycle of the higher operation frequency.   The non-visible 100–120 Hz flicker from fluorescent tubes powered by magnetic ballasts is associated with headaches and eyestrain. Individuals with high flicker fusion threshold are particularly affected by magnetic ballasts: their EEG alpha waves are markedly attenuated and they perform office tasks with greater speed and decreased accuracy. The problems are not observed with electronic ballasts.[6] Ordinary people have better reading performance using high-frequency (20–60 kHz) electronic ballasts than magnetic ballasts.[7]The flicker of fluorescent lamps, even with magnetic ballasts, is so rapid that it is unlikely to present a hazard to individuals with epilepsy. [8] Early studies suspected a relationship between the flickering of fluorescent lamps with magnetic ballasts and repetitive movement in autistic children. [9] However, these studies had interpretive problems[10] and have not been replicated.